Anatomy of the Ride: Barre Ride

Curious about Revolve’s Barre Ride? Created by Christianne Phillips, the Barre Ride is a revolutionary hybrid workout that’s gained popularity in DC and was recently featured on ABC7.

Dorothy Beatty, Francina Segbefia and Grant Hill are DC’s Barre Ride experts. Christianne, Dorothy and Francina gave us the inside scoop on the Barre Ride and why this unique combination benefits our Riders.

Dorothy Beatty, Revolve DC Instructor Francina Segbefia, Revolve DC Instructor

Barre Ride Instructors: Dorothy Beatty and Francina Segbefia

Q: Where did the idea of creating a hybrid barre/cycle class come from? Why do these workouts go together? 

CP: While creating classes for the DC studio, I wanted one of the rides to uniquely combine cardio and strength in one hour. As a former dancer and avid cyclist, I realized that fusing cycling and barre into one class would be a home run.

Barre is full body: your body is constantly working and engaging in multi-muscle movement. Our barre movements also incorporate a lot of stretching, and allow you to reset your posture.

FS: If a rider cycles for hours and hours, week after week, year after year, their muscles get very accustomed to the riding position. A rider needs cross-training exercises, and the barre exercises do a great job of creating muscle balance.

Q: What was the Barre Ride designed to do for Riders? What impact does it have on their bodies and how is that different from other cycling classes?

DB: Barre Ride strengthens our cardiovascular system and improves our body’s ability to effectively use oxygen and fuel. Our barre work strengthens muscles that assist cycling, and lengthen muscles that get overworked while riding.

FS: Think about the cycling posture. Most riders get tired after time, which often sacrifices cycling form. Barre exercises open up your chest, back and hip muscles that have been in a contracted position during cycling, and activate different muscle fibers that are not necessarily used in the same way while riding.

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Christianne teaching Barre Ride at Revolve DC

Q: What are your best tips for improving our Barre Ride?

DB: On the bike, Barre Ride is a great opportunity to push to new levels. It’s a shorter ride, so go for a bit more intensity – add more resistance than you normally would!

Off the bike, think big and full ranges of motion. Challenge yourself to go a little deeper or lower than last time; your body will adapt. PLEASE ask us questions, and watch your form in the mirror.

FS: If it’s your first Barre Ride, take frequent breaks and stretch. Most first-time Barre Riders have a difficult time completing every repetition. Be patient with yourself. Strength comes with time.

Attending Barre Ride regularly will strengthen the muscles we use in class. As your muscles get stronger and the exercises become easier, a Rider should focus more on form, contracting and flexing muscles a little tighter to continue to strengthen the muscles.

Q: What habits should we create and maintain to continue our lean muscle build once we leave the studio?

DB: The best thing you can do off the bike is eat a clean, balanced diet and drink a TON of water. Fuel your body with protein, veggies, and some fruit, as well as some smartly selected grains/carbs on our very intense workout days (e.g. brown rice or sweet potatoes). And, obviously, eat lots of kale to get Kira’s Kale Abs… 😉

FS: Refueling with the right combination of lean protein and carbohydrates post-workout is critical to building muscle. I teach Barre Ride in the morning, so my regular breakfast is usually egg whites, fruit and oatmeal. Eat protein throughout the entire day because your body is constantly rebuilding muscle. Finally, stretch and strength-train outside of the studio!

For more fitness and cycling tips, follow Dorothy and Francina on Twitter and like them on Facebook: Dorothy B Fit and Cycling with Francina.

Ready for a Barre Ride? Reserve your bike now and then mark your calendars for April 18: Dorothy’s teaching a special Beach Booty Barre Ride to get Riders ready for summer!

The Instructors Have Their Eyes On You

Revolve instructors may seem completely focused during classes on warming you up, motivating you, challenging you, and cueing you for sprints and hills. Don’t be fooled, though. That doesn’t mean they don’t keep an eye on your form and technique.  They can see you from the instructor podium – even you at the way back on bike 37. Here are some tips from instructor Grant Hill to keep in mind, because we always want to be improving. Monotony is boring and will hold you back, in life AND in exercise.
Revolve instructors may seem completely focused during classes on warming you up, motivating you, challenging you, and cueing you for sprints and hills. Don’t be fooled, though. That doesn’t mean they don’t keep an eye on your form and technique.  They can see you from the instructor podium – even you at the way back on bike 37. Here are some tips from instructor Grant Hill to keep in mind, because we always want to be improving. Monotony is boring and will hold you back, in life AND in exercise.
ImageRevolve instructors may seem completely focused during classes on warming you up, motivating you, challenging you, and cueing you for sprints and hills. Don’t be fooled, though. That doesn’t mean they don’t keep an eye on your form and technique.  They can see you from the instructor podium – even you at the way back on bike 37. Here are some tips from instructor Grant Hill to keep in mind, because we always want to be improving. Monotony is boring and will hold you back, in life AND in exercise.