Anatomy of the Ride: RIP Ride

Addicted to Revolve’s RIP Ride, or curious to try it?  It’s one or the other, trust us.  The ride was co-created by Christianne Phillips and Kira Stokes.  Kira gave us the inside scoop on the RIP Ride in our new blog series, Anatomy of the Ride.

Christianne Phillips, Senior Master Instructor         Kira Stokes, Master Instructor

RIP Ride Co-creators: Christianne Phillips (Senior Master Instructor) and Kira Stokes (Master Instructor)

Q: People are used to a mix of hills, intervals and sprints in class, but the RIP Ride focuses on intervals.  Why is that?

KS: The RIP Ride stands for “Resistance, Interval, Performance”, so it’s obvious from the name you are going to experience a unique form of interval training.  We wanted to make sure Revolvers would get the most out of the 60-minute class.  Interval training is proven to be one of the most effective ways to burn fat and improve speed, endurance and strength.

Q: What was the Rip Ride designed to do for riders?  How is it different from other indoor cycling classes?

KS: The RIP Ride combines cycling and upper-body strength work in a way that encourages body awareness, fatigues the body and keeps the integrity of the “form focused” studio Revolve is determined to be. Unique to the RIP Ride are two upper-body weight segments. Each segment is comprised of three exercises done three times through, circuit style.  We work in terms of progression each time through, adding slight variations to keep it fresh. The upper-body work begins and ends with upper-body back work to reset posture.

Riders admit they work harder during the cycling portions as opposed to a straight cycle class because they know there’s a short “active recovery” during the weight sections.

Q: Upper body is an integral part of the RIP ride and emphasizes posture.  What results should riders expect, and how can we get the most out of it?

KS: The upper-body work during the RIP Ride is no joke, no gimmicks, just work.  The weight segments are designed to reset posture after being forward on the bike, give riders a full-body workout, and create strong, lean upper bodies.

We recommend riders stop their legs during upper-body work to prioritize safety and body awareness.  Stopping the legs allows riders to focus 100% in order to work effectively and fatigue properly.

Q: What should we eat before and after a RIP Ride to get the most out of it?

KS: You never want to eat something too heavy pre-RIP Ride. Fruit, such as an apple, is a good choice. It provides a bit of sugar (natural energy) and hydrates at the same time. Throw in a handful of almonds for a little protein and you’re good to go!

Post-RIP Ride I love downing a protein shake with plant based protein powder with frozen fruit, water and ice (perhaps a little almond milk). This provides protein to rebuild fatigued muscles.

Ready for a RIP Ride? Reserve your bike now.

Photos: by Rachel Neville, (c) Revolve